Simply the Best: Teach Me How

This week’s 3 best things have a learning theme.

1. Second Time Lucky – While I usually work with a person because their mental health problems are causing communication difficulties, I also occasionally work with people who have lost their communication skills and as a result of this loss are experiencing problems with their mental health. Harriet* had a brain haemorrhage several years ago which resulted in a significant loss of her communication skills. This loss had a profound impact on Harriet’s sense of self and her social role, and she became depressed which in turn had a significant impact on her ability to engage in rehabilitation. Many mainstream therapy services may not be able to adapt their input to address the mental health components of an individual’s rehabilitation journey and for Harriet, the perceived inability to engage resulted in her being discharged. A change in approach that has acknowledged the mental health component of Harriet’s difficulties has allowed her to re-engage with Speech and Language Therapy and she is starting to make progress again.

2. Train the Trainer РEach year NHS Education for Scotland offer funding for Allied Health Professionals to undertake training or experiential learning to progress their career and improve the services they provide. This week I learned that I have secured funding to become a Talking Mats Accredited Trainer. This will allow me to offer training in this extremely useful communication approach in my local area and I am so excited about the ways in which this will improve communication practice in our mental health services.

3. Family Ties – Our relationships with family and close friends are key in supporting our mental wellbeing, but for the people with communication difficulties these often impact on interactions with these important people. An individual’s communication barriers are only half the story though; the other person’s understanding of these difficulties and how to cope with them are just as important. This week I have had the opportunity to do some very rewarding work with a number of families; supporting understanding, increasing skills and ensuring these important relationships are maintained.

* Harriet is a pseudonym to protect client confidentiality.

Simply the Best: Nurture

My 3 best things about being a mental health SLT this week appear to have a nurturing theme – conversations that nurture understanding, nurturing the learning of others, and nurturing skills and self-reliance…

1. Talk to Me – When a client walks in to clinic distressed and is able to walk out calmer and with a sense of direction and achievement I know what I do is worthwhile. There are times when we need to talk through our difficulties in order to sort things out and to feel better but this is much more difficult if you also have a communication difficulty. When you cannot find the words to express how you feel or explain why you are feeling that way, others find it that much harder to help you find the right solution. When you cannot organise information in a meaningful way you can feel that others are not listening to you or even find that you get yourself even more confused than before. John* arrived for his appointment this week in a very flustered state. He had been feeling overwhelmed in recent weeks and this was impacting on his ability to discuss his worries with his family and friends. By creating a structure around the conversation and providing appropriate feedback, John was able to organise his thoughts and we were able to work through his problems, and he left his appointment much happier and calmer than before.

2. Look to the Future – As part of my job I am involved in the clinical education of student Speech and Language Therapists from Queen Margaret University. My current student is approaching the end of her placement and it makes me so happy to watch her confidence grow and her skills develop. This is one of the very few adult mental health placements available in Scotland currently and it is wonderful to be involved in developing clinical interest and skills for this client group in our emerging workforce.

3. First Steps – Our new group for clients who have recently been diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome started this week. The purpose of the group is to provide information about Asperger Syndrome; helping these individuals to have better understanding about the ways in which they communicate, think and act differently from others, to develop coping strategies, and to establish relationships and gain support from peers who are “the same as me”. First sessions are difficult for everyone – especially people with Asperger Syndrome – but by creating an Asperger friendly environment and pacing information and demands correctly our group was a great success.

John* is a pseudonym to protect client confidentiality

Simply the Best

It’s been a good long while since I last blogged. This has been partially due to being extremely short on time recently, but also because I had slightly lost direction and was unsure what stories I still had to tell. However, it seems that despite my recent silence, interest in my blog has remained with almost 600 “hits” since my last post. This has reminded me why I started this blog…

…there are still very few Speech & Language Therapists working in the field of adult mental health [so] The purpose of mentalhealthslt is to share my experiences not only with other Speech & Language Therapists but with anyone who works in or has an interest in mental health.

So it’s about time I got back to doing just that!

One of the things I regularly do with people is help them to focus on positive situations and work to their strengths rather than dwelling on negatives and difficulties. A friend of mine also writes a blog which is titled “Rachel’s Three Beautiful Things” which does exactly what is says on the tin. Rachel writes about three beautiful things that happened to her that day – an idea I love. So I am going to borrow the concept (which she also borrowed so I don’t think she will mind) for the next wee while to help get this blog back on track.

By highlighting the three best things each week about being a Speech and Language Therapist working in mental health services, and hopefully encouraging other colleagues to do the same, I believe that I can continue with my mission to spread awareness and develop understanding of the unique and valuable role we play.

So here goes. Here are here the 3 best things about this week…

1. The Sweet Sound of Success – About 18 months ago I met a lady called Sarah* who had become mute following a significant psychological trauma. She had not uttered a word for over 10 years and had become completely socially isolated and reliant on her family for even basic tasks. This week marked my final session with a now very talkative Sarah* who is living her life to the full having rediscovered herself and her role as wife, mother and grandmother.

2. Group Fever – There are a significant number of people with Asperger Syndrome who access mental health services. Many have very little understanding of their diagnosis and can find it difficult to participate in mainstream groups run by the community mental health teams. From next week I am running a group along with an Occupational Therapist and a Support Worker specifically to meet the needs of these clients. We had our final planning meeting this week and everyone is so positive, excited and enthusiastic – it’s infectious!!

3. All for One – This week I have been working in partnership with a broad range of people including a University Disability Advisor, staff in the local library, family members, nurses and psychologists to name but a few. These partnerships help me to ensure that my clients get the best possible service from me and from others, and being able to do that is one of the best things about my job.

*Sarah is a pseudonym to protect client confidentiality