A Sensational Life

A change of topic from my 3 best things this week as I have not been doing my normal clinical work. Instead have been attending a course on Sensory Integration and I would like to share my thoughts on what I have learned with you.

What do you think of as a sensory based difficulty? It is far more than a hearing or visual loss. Our understanding of the sensory aspects of the world in which we function tends towards the more traditional senses of sight, hearing, taste and smell but we seldom consider the significance of information we gain from touch and movement.

Sensory issues are being increasingly recognised as being a core part of Autism Spectrum Conditions and these is very well described by Cynthia Kim in her blog Musings of an Aspie, but I wonder how many other individuals who access Mental Health services experience sensory processing and integration difficulties.

The reason I say this is that I now have a very different understanding and perspective on the link between our sensory processing and emotional state. Our brains receive and start to process sensory information in the same areas that control our emotional and physiological responses. An unexpected loud noise will initially elicit a “flight or fight” reflexive response from us but it will subside if we don’t actually need to act to protect ourselves. But how would you feel and function if your neurological system could not integrate this sensory information sufficiently to allow you to return to your normal level of arousal within a short period of time? Or if this level of high arousal was elicited by activities that others did not find stressful such as the movement of riding on a bus or the feeling of the label on the T-shirt you are wearing? And what would it do to your ability to use your higher cognitive skills and therefore your thinking patterns?

This is a very simplistic summary of how sensory integration difficulties could impact on our mental health and well-being but a good place to start. By using “sensory glasses” to consider human behaviour and interpreting what we observe in relation to neurological processing of this information, sensory integration seems to me to offer an exciting new perspective on the way we can provide meaningful support people who experience mental health difficulties.

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